Unplugged Energy Independence

2012 Census Shows Wood Heating Continues Growth Streak

Posted by Kelsey Loeffler on Wed,Oct 02,2013 @ 09:55 AM

US Census mapAccording to recently released U.S. Census statistics, 63,566 more families used wood or pellets as a primary heating fuel in 2012 compared to 2011, which amounts to an increase of 2.6 percent, making wood again the fastest growing heating fuel in America.

From 2000 to 2010, wood and pellet home heating grew by 34 percent, faster than any of the other heating fuels, including solar and natural gas. Oil and propane use declined between 2000 and 2010, and the decline continued in 2012.

Today, 2.1 percent of Americans use wood or pellets as their primary heating fuel, up from 1.6 percent in 2000. An additional 7.7 percent of U.S. households use wood as a secondary heating fuel, according to the 2009 EIA Renewable Energy Consumption Survey.

Nearly 2.5 million households use wood as a primary heating fuel, making it, by far, the dominant residential source of renewable energy in the United States. In comparison, only about 500,000 of U.S. homes have solar panels and less than 50,000 use solar thermal heating. Solar thermal heating dropped by 2 percent in 2012 from 2011, according to the new Census numbers.

The states with the biggest growth in wood heat from 2011 to 2012 are Delaware (35.1 percent), Rhode Island (29.6 percent), Nebraska (24.6 percent), New Hampshire (18.5 percent) and New Jersey (17.7 percent). However, other states experienced declines. Among the important wood heating states of Washington, Oregon and California, the decline was very small, but there were more significant declines in Illinois (5.2 percent), Idaho (5 percent) and Colorado (4.8 percent). Over a 12-year period, the prevalence of wood heating has increased, often very significantly, in every state except Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida and Hawaii.

Topics: wood pellet, wood pellets, wood heat, wood heating, woodmaster, WoodMaster FlexFuel, wood pellet heat, outdoor wood furnace, outdoor wood furnaces

Buy local (energy included)

Posted by Kelsey Gagner on Wed,Nov 09,2011 @ 10:52 AM

The holidays are just around the corner. Do you typically buy your holiday presents from local vendors? Do you care if a product is made in your community, state or country?

Many people do.

Why is it that we often look down on consumer products made overseas, while we don’t think twice about purchasing fossil fuels from across the world?

Local energy is possible.

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, 57 percent of U.S. oil is imported. Importing foreign oil negatively affects our economy, security and environment.

Shipping in oil from the Middle East is not our only option. Alternative residential heating sources, such as wood burning, exist.

Wood can come from your local community—or even from your own backyard. By fueling with local wood, you’re not only preventing sending money overseas, but also contributing to your local economy. This giving back propels local industry, jobs and economic stimulus.

Local energy can be affordable.

Heating with wood is a wise choice with excellent ROI. However, we realize the upfront costs of switching to wood may be too much for lower income families. That’s why we offer incentives, like cash back and financing plans. By switching to an independent energy source, low-income families may no longer need assistance with purchasing expensive fossil fuels.

Unfortunately, sometimes incentives and financing plans aren’t enough to help families with very low incomes change to wood heating. This is where we need governmental policies in place. Partially funded by the US Forest Service Wood Education and Resource Center (WERC), the year-long study Transforming Wood Heat in America: A Toolkit of Policy Options explores the existing and potential policy options for incentivizing more efficient and clean burning residential wood heat.

The goal of the study was to discover ways for Americans of all socio-economic groups to use wood heat and reduce reliance on fossil fuels. John Ackerly and Tatiana Butler of the Alliance for Green Heat co-wrote the report.

Wood is the resource that has always been here, always will be here, and is truly sustainable, dependable and local.

Topics: Wood furnaces, wood heat, expensive fossil fuels, alliance for green heat, affordable heat, affordable heating source, U.S. energy administration, residential wood heat, local energy, woodmaster, Flex Fuel, wood master

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